Parenting Press®Parenting Press home pageOnline Media Kit
Mudras
by Emily Fuller Williams, LMT
Emily Williams

About:
the Book
the Author
Parenting Press

Feature stories:
Mudras: Power in Your Hands
Relieve Stress with Scent, Sound, Self-Massage, Mudras

Reviewer and reader comments

Order the book

Parenting Press home page

Media kits introduction

Book cover

Feature Story
Relieve Stress with Scent, Sound, Self-Massage, Mudras

When you're tense with worry about your own life—your relationships, your health, the economy, your work—or when you're tied in knots with "second hand stress" from the people you live with or help in your professional life, there are at least four ways you can relieve these worries.

calmness mudra
Emily Fuller Williams demonstrates the calmness mudra.

Emily Fuller Williams, who started out to be a classroom teacher but found a different "helping" career as a massage therapist, tells us we can ease our tension with scent, sound, self-massage and mudras.

Emily Fuller Williams, who started out to be a classroom teacher but found a different "helping" career as a massage therapist, tells us we can ease our tension with scent, sound, self-massage and mudras.

Williams, who is a member of a Cleveland-area practice that includes psychologists and mental health counselors, is the author of Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress and the companion Mudra Pocket Cards. Whatever concerns you, she recommends you consider:

  • Scent. Lavender is the most popular scent in the world, in part because of its ability to help people relax. As even the Wall Street Journal has reported, medical school studies show that the aroma of this member of the mint family can slow your heart rate and blood pressure.

    Chamomile is also valuable for relaxation. Bergamot, the scent in Earl Gray tea, is like all citrus oils known to be an anti-depressive.

    If you're drooping, Williams suggests ginger, which many find invigorating. That's why she uses crystalized ginger in her own tea. Rosemary and mint, or a combination of the two, are also popular scents, and they help people concentrate.

  • Sound. Williams uses recordings of ocean waves and Native American flute music to relax massage clients, especially those tense because of cancer therapy and life-threatening conditions. She also refers us to The Vein of Gold: A Journey to Your Creative Heart, in which author Julia Cameron advises, "Take seriously the idea that music can represent emotional states." It categorizes such music as Enya's The Celts, Watermark and Shepherd Moon and Michael Hoppe's The Poet as "heart music, which works to open your heart."

  • Self-massage. By brushing an arm from shoulder to fingertips, you can move nervous energy down and out of your body, she believes. "I had one client who knew that she picked up other people's stress," recalls the author. "When she practiced brushing herself off after being with worried people, she relieved that secondhand stress."

  • Mudras. The "calmness" gesture, in which you rotate upstretched hands at the wrist, is one of several "hand yoga" movements that reduce anxiety and worry. Practicing these can keep you productive at work, even when you're facing challenging deadlines, Williams says. The calmness mudra is one of the 24 described and illustrated in her new book, which also suggests how to incorporate the gestures into everyday life.

###

You may use any of the material in the online media kits for book reviews and stories that mention the book and its author.

For more information, contact the Parenting Press publicity department at (800) 992-6657, ext. 105 or (206) 364-2900, ext. 105, or email our Publicity Coordinator.